F and I training day at Talland

It was a fun and informative day run by the legendary Pammy Hutton. Held at the impressive Talland school of Equitation.

Pammy started the day on her own young horse. She explained that she would like to get us all to encourage young horses to do more lateral work. In particular, to encourage shoulder in and half pass training early on, to gain greater control in difficult situations when the young horses are nervous or overwhelmed. 

Throughout the day we were lucky to have a super selection of both riding school horses (most of which had competed to a high level) and riders that brought their own horses to the training day. They were all very interesting to watch as they all had super personalities and some were easier to get a tune out of than others. However, all the riders finished with a smile on their faces and seemed to have gained a greater insight into their strengths and weaknesses once they had ridden. 

The day finished with Pammy riding the lovely Magnum. She explained the rider position checklist she goes through every time she rides. She does lots of work without stirrups to improve her depth of seat and would encourage us all to do the same on a regular basis. She worked on Magnum’s balance and outline, asking him to be a lot more up and out. She talked about the importance of rhythm and how in test riding you can gain so many marks by just riding the movements in a rhythm.

In this last session, it was super to see how Pammy and her daughter Pippa work together as a team to get the best out of one another’s riding. Pippa took no prisoners when correcting Pammy’s mistakes in the canter pirouettes but was quick to praise when things got better. Little corrections pointed out by Pippa in the contact in both the trot and canter work led to better balance and rhythm. Pammy took the instruction with grace and a smile on her face. 

One of the greatest things about these training days is that you realise everyone is nervous about making mistakes or looking inadequate or foolish. Pammy told us all to be more confident and to try to put your best foot forward, but above all to work hard to try to get better every day. The great thing about Pammy is although she is thought of as tough and a bit ‘shouty’ it’s all done from the heart! She genuinely wants you to get better and loves the horses she works with. She’s been there and done it and has so many stories and experiences to share. 

It was lovely to catch up with old friends and make a few new ones. I would like to thank Jeremy Michaels and Jude Mathews for arranging the day and Pammy Hutton for her time and expertise. Also, I would like to note that the office and helpers at Talland were great too!

Report by Sarah Stewart BHSI

Training Day with Nick Turner FBHS

F & I North West Region Training day at Myerscough College, 28th March 2017.

As an F & I member based in Lancashire, and the Stable Yard Manager at Myerscough College, I was delighted to be able to provide the facilities for the North West Region, spring training day.

The day started with a couple of hours of flatwork sessions, then the majority of the day focussed on jumping. However, throughout the day there was a common theme, ‘Less is more’.

Nick was excellent at reminding us all about strong, simple, basics of good riding. He was consistent during the day ensuring we didn’t make things too complicated for the horse or ‘Their shutters will come down and start to say no’ – the horse will struggle to understand what is required.

He highlighted that good preparation was key to success, whether that was riding lateral movements, transitions, or the approach to a fence, being clear not to ‘harass’ the horse. Doing less, was allowing the horse time to digest the information given from the rider, which resulted in a more fluent, clear and calm way of going.

During the jump sessions, there was a variety of obstacles placed well in the arena, to ensure we rode positively and reacted quickly. Nick wanted us to let the horse see its own stride to the fence, ‘just ride forward and straight, allowing the horse to make a decision’. Always reminding us to ‘breathe, relax and keep our body up – not back’. Thus allowing the rider to use their body more effectively, and aid the natural ability of the horse.

I even managed to enjoy a spot of jumping with my reins in one hand – yes this was intentional! It was an extremely effective method to stop the rider, (me on this occasion) interfering with the horse’s rhythm and stride into the fence, trying to place the horse where I thought it needed to be. A fabulous exercise to stop bad habits that we acquire. While maintaining balance, fluency and a forward canter. I am happy to report I wasn’t the only rider to be asked to do this!

Thank you Nick Turner, for your enthusiasm, inspiration and clear sound training advice. Ensuring harmony and understanding between horse and rider.

And thank you Sue Ricketts for organising the day for the North West Region. We are looking forward to the next one!

Report by Kirsten Owen BHSI