AFTER COVID 19 – William Micklem

AFTER COVID 19 – William Micklem – Part 1

PERCEPTION NOT FACT

An association with horses is provably life enhancing, an activity that can be hugely beneficial, both mentally and physically  ….a sport for all, and a sport for life.  Whether seriously disabled or seriously able extraordinary things are possible in partnership with ponies and horses.  It is simply an exceptional sport that few other sports can match in terms of scope and benefits.  We should not be afraid of shouting this from the roof tops.  However as we emerge from lockdown into the new normal, with testing financial conditions and difficult choices needing a re-evaluation of both our working lives and sporting priorities, we should also not hold back from changes to make the most of our life enhancing sport and help those working in the industry to survive. 

Here are 10 ideas that I hope are food for positive thoughts: Read more AFTER COVID 19 – William Micklem

NATIONAL EQUINE FORUM REPORT MARCH 2020

As I write this on the train heading back to Cheshire, I am reflecting on what has been a truly thought provoking day at The National Equine Forum.

I firstly want to say a big thank you to the F&I Association for the opportunity for myself and Alex Wyatt to attend the forum. Having arrived slightly late due to train issues I arrived as Dr Richard Newton had started his talk on managing infectious disease risks and his recent experiences and thoughts on the topic. He touched on the recent outbreak of equine flu and how warnings were given but more should have been done to block the chain of transmission.

He then went on to talk about other diseases including EVA and EHV-1. What I found most interesting was his discussion on an outbreak of EHV-1 at a yard, he went into detail on how the disease spread throughout the yard based on the yard set up and management. It was no great surprise that the horses on this yard that were stabled in an American barn style block all contracted the disease with some fatalities. Whereas the horse stabled in the external blocks had much fewer cases spread from horse to horse. He then went on to discuss the importance of bio security in cases of any diseases outbreak but also how people must take responsibility for making the general public aware of any disease outbreak and the role social media has in helping with this.

We next heard from James Hick from the BHS on the work he and a fantastic team of over 300 volunteers are doing to help save our access to public rights of way across the UK. These routes are slowly being lost and need us all to start making sure any bridleways in our area are recorded before 2026. After this any routes that are not on record will be lost permanently.

The next group of speakers came under the heading “Global Issues, National Impact”.

Ian Cawsey, Director of Advocacy and Campaigns from the Donkey Sanctuary started this section off talking about an issue I was completely unaware of. It was the impact that the Donkey skin trade for the production of Ejiao in China was having on the Donkey population worldwide. The demand for this product has seen a drop in over 8 million donkeys and a surge in poachers stealing the donkeys from farmers in developing third world countries. It’s not only sad that these animals are being slaughtered for their skin, but they really are an integral part everyday life to villagers and farmers across many developing countries. The other issue the donkey sanctuary was trying to deal with was the appalling conditions the animals were being held and slaughtered in but also the way in which the carcasses were being disposed of and a complete lack of biosecurity. This was a real eye opener for me, and I will certainly be making a donation to this charity in future.

Next up, we got to hear from Roly Owers, chief executive from World Horse Welfare, on our future with horses and how social licences can help. Now this was a new concept for me (social licensing) but one that made complete sense. Roly talked about how important public perception of horse sport is. Animal rights activists will argue how ‘use is abuse’, but we need to ensure that we educate the public on how we use but don’t abuse our horses. Issues such as use of the whip or marking of horses with spurs have never been more in the spotlight. Social licensing is an unwritten contract between our industry and the general public, and it is crucial that each and everyone of us takes responsibility to promote good horsemanship practices, whether it be on the world stage or just hacking down the road.

This topic was then carried on with Dr Barry Johnson from the Horse Board. He used the racing industry as an example of how important it is to promote good welfare for the horses, not just during their competitive career but from birth right through to retirement.

After a delicious lunch, the afternoon speakers were all talking about improving equine health and welfare by changing our behaviour.

The first speaker was Dr Zac Baynham-Herd from the behavioural insight team. He was giving us an insight into applying behavioural changes to people.
This was followed by Professor Sarah Freeman who is a Professor of Veterinary Surgery from Nottingham University. Sarah Talked about her involvement with the research and development of the ‘React’ campaign which is being run through the BHS. Its aim is to educate people on recognising early signs of colic. The Question is, can an educational campaign such as this change people’s behaviour? The current thinking is that it will take an average of 15 years to implement and see any changes.

Next we heard from David Rendle, Council Member of the British Equine Veterinary Association. His talk was all about Anthelmintic Resistance in horses, the worrying rises in worm resistance and the fact that there are currently no new anthelmintic treatments on the market. His emphasis was focused on the need for educating and encouraging a change in people’s behaviour when it comes to worming programs. Maybe there is a need for an educational campaign targeting large yards on the importance of diagnostic worming?

The final two speakers in this section were Jude Matthews, Chief Executive of British Eventing and Andrew and Abigail Turnbull, Owners and Directors of Richmond Equestrian Centre. They talked about the devastating outbreak of Strangles at the centre last year and how the centre had to cancel their BE event as well as other competitions. Then, how they controlled the outbreak from spreading by carrying out strict Bio security on the yard and continue to do this to this day. It is so easy to become complacent when we take our horses out to competition centres and other yards but listening to these guys talk about the measures they now take, really made me think about my own bio security with my own horses!

We were then treated to a sneak peak ahead of this year’s Olympics. Some photos and a video from Tim Hadaway, Director for Games Operations, FEI and Henry Bullen who is Director of Peden Bloodstock who are responsible for transporting all the equine athletes out to Tokyo. It was great to get a glimpse of what we can expect from Tokyo at the Equestrian Park. Lets just hope that this Corona Virus doesn’t ruin it for us all!

The Final “Memorial” Lecture was given by Kirsty Whitnall from the RSPCA. Kirsty gave us a brilliant insight into the great work she and her colleagues are doing including some horses that have been rescued and rehomed.

But of course, the closing speaker was none other than HRH The Princess Royal. What a great way to end a brilliant day of inspirational speakers by getting to listen to HRH give us her thoughts on the day.

So, in summary, a great day. So much food for thought. I feel we all need to be more responsible for helping make a change. Whether it be horse welfare, educating clients on worming programs, or promoting good bio security, take your pick!

Report by David Llewellyn BHSI

F&I TRAINING DAY TALLAND 9TH MARCH 2020.

Talland’s Pammy Hutton FBHS

This day was kindly organised by Talland School of Equitation.

A group of eager F’s and I’s were welcomed by Pammy Hutton FBHS at Talland School of Equitation on a cold Monday morning. The group was a mixture of both riders and spectators.

At 10am prompt, an action-packed programme began and the first of the 3 riders were given the arena and some younger horses to assess and critique. The horses were quality types with varying levels of schooling from green to more experienced. Pammy was very encouraging with the riders to ride the horses forward and straight to achieve the best way of going. The onlookers were also actively involved to give their opinions on the way of going of the horses and were asked for their observations.

Next, we saw more established horses with schooling levels from prelim to advanced medium, the same 3 riders stayed in the arena and swapped onto these horses. More discussion was encouraged by all and Pammy discussed the horses in relation to the fellowship assessment, and how the riders should also comment on the basic way of going of the horses in their discussions, as well as talking about the more advanced movements that they have established.

Pammy Hutton coaching David Sheerin

Pammy was supported by Islay Auty FBHS and Sam York FBHS, who contributed greatly to the riders and spectators, and gave valuable advice as well as great tips for our future training of partnerships.

The third group of riders were given more advanced horses ranging from adv medium to PSG and Inter 1. The riders were quickly given specific tasks to work on and encouraged to “ride in the quality” in all that they do.

Over a working lunch, the group observed Pammy help David Sherrin on his beautiful eventer. David was having some explosive moments when asking for changes and Pammy gave him some great help to achieve a cleaner change. We all enjoyed seeing the improvement.

The afternoon saw some coaching sessions take place where coaches were practical and correct in their coaching techniques. Again, valuable advice came from Pammy, Islay and Sam as well as from the spectators.

Pammy Hutton coaching David Sheerin

The day rounded off watching Pammy ride her own Magnum and she clearly demonstrated her ”feel” for the horse and showed her experience for us all to see.

It was a truly great day that was had by all, and it was most lovely to hear Mrs Molly Sivewright FBHS mentioned on several occasions throughout the day for being the wonderful horsewoman that she was. It is very clear that her fond memory lives on in all that is Talland.

A huge thankyou to Pammy and her team at Talland for a most special day.

P.S. We even learned that there are 53 roundabouts between Talland and Keysoe, but that story is for another day!!

Report by Carl Crofts BHSI

Ruth Baxter’s Letter to H&H

Ruth Baxter wrote a letter to Horse & Hound which was published in the 23rd Jan 2020 edition. As the letter was edited by H&H and now makes far less sense to those who were at the F&I convention, it was suggested that Ruth should send the unedited version out. Please find it below:

“Dear Editor,

Last weeks training feature included a quote from me about how the BHS education system had provided a path when academia did not suit. I started on that path at 16 (then the earliest age you could take the exams) as a riding school assistant with a passion. In the last 18 years I have worked my way up the levels, achieving the Stage 5 qualification (BHSI) in 2016. Since qualifying, I am able to attend the Fellows and Instructors Association annual course, this year’s being held last week at the revamped Addington Equestrian Centre. A fantastic gathering of over 100 BHSI and FBHS’s, studying and engaging with lessons given by Adam Kemp FBHS and Corrine Bracken UKCC4 to the likes of Pammy Hutton and Nick Gauntlett. Whether we were prospective Olympians, or ex riding school assistants who had fought their way up the ranks, we were all welcomed, involved and educated. All brought together by the BHS education system. To anyone out there wondering whether the system is for them, the opportunities can be well worthwhile.

Ruth Baxter”

Minutes of the AGM 2020

Held on Tuesday 7th January 2020 at 7.00pm

At Addington Manor Equestrian Centre, Bucks by kind permission of Chris Parker

1.  Welcome address by Jillie Rogers BHSI – Chairman.

All were warmly welcomed to this packed AGM – held downstairs in the café for the first time.  Thank you to Addington for hosting us, and Ann for organising. Both brilliant.

2.  Attendance and Apologies for Absence (Committee members in bold)

Present:  Jillie Rogers, Ann Bostock, Alison Craig, Debbie Follett, David Sheerin, Mandy Luesley, Amy Bannister-Bell, Danny Anholt via Messenger, Nicole Biggs, Ann Peate, Faith Ponsonby, Mandy Chaffin, Judith Murphy, Gemma Porter-Rawlings, Ruth Baxter, Amanda Holloway, Charlotte Tarrant, Katie Partrick, Brendan Bergin, Sarah Stewart, Kirsten Owen, Sarah Fitton, Hetta Wilkinson, Julian Campbell, Maggie Doel, Jeremy Michaels, Jen Burnett, Richard Johnston-Smith, Jennifer Ham, Sue Pimbley, Becky Johnson, Beth Boyes, Nick Gauntlett, Mark Robinson, Sophie Cox, Ernest Dillon, Sue Payne, Sarah MacDonald, Elizabeth Allen, Clare Chamberlayne, Lisa Morris, Sarah Thorne, Oonagh Meyer, Debbie Melville, Sabrina Jones, Jayne Smart, Lizzel Winter, Hilary Westropp, Sam Champney Warrener, Cherry Elvin, Nicola Greenhalgh-Brook, Annette Philpot, Annette Christey, Philly Muir, Helen Martin, Alex Hulme, Lyndsay Gammon, Ellie Halsey, Jo Chilcott, Alex Wyatt-Hughes, Alice Bannister-Bell, Sally Jackson, Melissa Troup, Dan Spencer, Wendy Suddes, Liz Eaton, Simon Somers, William Blane, Tessa Ryley, Alec Miles, Kylie Roddy, Kirsty Fontaine-Henley, Victoria Gallantree, Karen Winston, David Llewellyn, Anne-Marie Taylor, Carol Bennitt, Becky Cooper, Linda de Matteo, Eric Horgan, Micheline Horgan, Jenny Ward, Margie Craib, Islay Auty, Biddy Brasted Watts, Nikki Herbert, Eric Smiley.

Apologies:  Sam York, Tessa Martin-Bird, Fred Hodges, Candice Williams, Elspeth Watson, Victoria Hayton, Clare Sansom, Sally Newcomb, Joanna Potterton, Nick Turner, Gill Watson, Tim Downes, Grainne Sugars, Sue Ricketts, Sue Charters, Sandra Morrison, Liz Taylor, Erik McKechnie, Linda Pearce, Catherine Shine, Caroline Moon, Jo Winfield, Caro Haynes, Carole Broad, Caroline Stevenson, Cheryl Bezants, Donn Collins, Wendy Summers.  Danny Anholt – complete with ode read by Jillie.

3.  Minutes of last AGM (held 8th January 2019 at Addington Manor)

3.1 The minutes were approved as a correct record.

4.  Matters Arising from those Minutes

4.1 Following the meeting last year, the F&I “coaches” page in the British Horse magazine was successfully reinstated (JR, with help from the BHS team).  It slipped off again for the December issue following a magazine revamp – JR will pursue again.  Danny Anholt and Faith Ponsonby both writing articles for forthcoming issues.  More contributions welcomed.

5.  Chairman’s Review for the Year 2019   

5.1   Thank yous to this course’s Study Group leaders, to our Regional Reps (Ireland Faith Ponsonby, Scotland Jen Burnett, North Sue Ricketts, South West Danny Anholt, South East Mandy Luesley), and to the Committee members.

5.2  Special thankyous to departing Committee – David Sheerin and Debbie Follett. 

5.3  Welcome to the nominated replacement Committee members Oonagh Meyer and Jude Murphy (see Election of Committee below)

5.4  See attached “Review for the Year 2019” by Jillie Rogers.

6.  Treasurer’s Report for the Year 2019   

6.1  Debbie Follett summarised the training days held and the profit generated in the year of £1,520 – big thanks to those generously providing facilities free. 

6.2  We now have 210 members in total – an encouraging increase.  End of year cash balance now £20k. The financial summary was distributed – attached here.

6.3  Notable increase in events run that also generated a charitable donation to the horse industry – welcomed by all.

7.  Election of Committee for 2020

7.1 As outlined in the “planning for the AGM” document sent out to all members last year, David Sheerin and Debbie Follett both sadly stood down at this meeting.  Nominations for their successors were sought, and Jude Murphy was nominated by Faith Ponsonby and seconded by Brendan Bergin, and Oonagh Meyer was nominated by Sam Champney Warrener and seconded by Debbie Melville.  Both were warmly welcomed by all.

8.  Any Other Business

8.1  Questions have been circulating in recent months about the industry moving on, which have implications for possible changes to our membership criteria.

Firstly, the strength of the International Group for Equestrian Qualifications (IGEQ) which defines the “International Level 3” qualification – which is of course based upon our own BHSI syllabus originally.  We have now had two approaches for F&I membership under this international equivalency.  Do we admit them?  And if so, how?  It seems we should, but currently our Constitution technically doesn’t allow us to.

Secondly, the launch of the BHS Pathways Stage 5 due later this year 2020 will create Stage 5 “discipline specialists”.  Are we going to be able to admit these Stage 5 discipline specialists to F&I membership?  Again, currently our Constitution doesn’t mention a Stage 5, let alone a discipline specific one…

Both these questions raise a number of issues – of which the factual components need to be established first, in terms of actual equivalency, rigour of the exam processes, etc etc. 

Thirdly, our Constitution is already out of date in its current wording, including missing out details of our recently added Awards (Achievement, and Tom Searle).

The Chair and Committee propose that a Working Party look at both issues, consult widely, and by the autumn 2020 come up with a proposal for how the F&I Association responds to these developments and thus creates a broader and more inclusive Association.

At the end of that process the changes to the Constitution will be proposed and put to the full F&I membership with a minimum of 30 days’ notice prior to the January 2021 AGM.

This was agreed by all present as a sensible way forward.

All assistance with the Working Party’s deliberations welcomed in due course! 

8.2 To Sam Champney Warrener – thank you for running the closed Facebook page so well for us.

To Sally Newcomb – thank you for running the website so well for us.

8.3 From Chris Parker (Addington) and Ann Bostock – stabling for the Addington course next year (5/6 January 2021) must be booked and paid for by 1st January.

9.  Remembrance

All present were invited to stand to remember Dorothy Johnson – not an F&I member but many may remember her.  She died in June 2019 aged 96, having retired aged 88.  And Clarissa Dawson, one of our stalwart members who died in March 2019 after a brave battle with cancer.  Donn Collins read the eulogy at Clarissa’s funeral and F&I were represented on the day.

10. Presentation of Awards

Upstairs over dinner, between courses…  and there were 91 of us for dinner!

Tom Searle award – Brendan Bergin

Achievement Award – Ann Bostock

Pat Smallwood Award – David Sheerin

The cheers and standing ovations went on and on…  What an outstanding evening all round.

11. Date of next AGM

Tuesday 5 January 2021, at Addington, 7pm. 

Posted in AGM

F&I Annual Course Report

January 2020, Addington.

What an inspiring two days. Corinne Bracken and Adam Kemp complemented each other, both in their methodology and in their delivery. For two days we felt totally torn between which coach to watch! The discussion section held on Tuesday was a brilliant idea and gave us a good insight to both coaches’ philosophy and experience.

Overwhelmingly they spoke with a combination of common sense and passion. The discussion was fantastic – we all could have listened to them talk for hours. It was both refreshing and reassuring to hear two exceptional coaches discuss with vehemence how the welfare of the horse must be at the forefront of all training and not trying to sell their ‘way’ as being right. Adam discussed how the dressage horse isn’t able to ‘see’ what was coming, whereas the showjumper could see, and explained how this influenced coaching. Both were supportive of basic training, and spoke about how today’s rider seemed to miss out on ‘Horsemanship’ and were often unable to handle their horses on the ground, and were competing in some areas above their capability. They said that many riders could benefit from thinking like the horse, understanding why their horses would react or shy, for example.

Corinne used circles and 90 degree turns, ‘pole gym’ and guide rails during the warm up stage of each session, regardless of experience, improving stability and rideability and a favourite of ours, riding in between the oxers, or bounce fences before jumping them, which encourage riders to hold their position and leg aid, to help straightness.

The use of a smaller fences towards the end of the arena, was explained. Encouraging the horse to ‘energise’ the canter by engaging the hind leg, with a caveat, that with a tired horse it would kill the canter. Corinne explained the use of plenty of oxers, being the only obstacle to truly work to horse’s core muscles, improving technique.

And how refreshing to hear plenty of humour in the sessions. So many quotes we remembered, because the delivery was fun.
Corinne – “you can’t collect a crooked horse, collection only happens with energy, you can only go fast or slow if they are crooked, but remember in the scales of training, what comes before collection?………. Absolutely Everything.”

“Never underestimate the size of the fence in training, big fences are often used for lack of technique” “Always striving for ‘Rideability’” “Often the more you chase the horse, the more they’ll back off.”

Adam’s analogies of our sport – “You wouldn’t make the tennis racket and then learn the game, or build the Formula 1 car or a Sailing boat and compete when they aren’t quite finished.”

Leg into hand – “There’s no such thing as a one-armed accordion player” and “use your legs before you do it, not after you’ve messed up”.
Adam spoke about how we use language to get to the correct understanding; for example, in the Piaffe work, he would describe the movement being ‘in place’ rather than ‘on the spot’.

He used a whole range of exercises to work and improve each horse and rider – and explained that the Grand Prix test was the best example of asking for “On and Back” throughout an entire test.

There are mountains of notes that we took, too many to mention, but from a spectator’s point of view, it was good to witness progression and horses with a varied experience and ability. Corinne & Adam were both superb at relaying information and including spectators and study groups in each session.

Both coaches appreciated being able to work with knowledgeable and able riders and spectators on these two days too – they both said they really enjoyed it! Next year’s coaches have a tough act to follow. But we are all enthused and are very much looking forward to next year’s Annual Course.

Report by:
Kirsty Fontaine-Henley BHSI, Hayley Newman BHSI, Lowri Powell BHSL5 E&C, Rachelle Purnell. BHS IIT.

CHAIRMAN’S REVIEW of 2019

AGM JANUARY 2020

“Ladies & Gentlemen

Once again it is my pleasure to stand in front of you to give the Chairman’s Review of the past year. We have 91 for supper, the biggest number ever. I am in awe of the length & breadth of this professional association’s membership – people who are prepared to go that extra mile in organizing and presenting such a wide variety of days for us all to attend. You have all taken to heart my plea in the spring newsletter for our days to break even and they have. There was some confusion between the GBS & the euro payments for the Irish Day, so capably organised by Faith Ponsonby, so Faith has decided everyone should pay sterling direct to our Treasurer, for 2020.

Looking at the 2019 calendar of events, it was a very busy year, we have visited studs, including a very in depth look at breeding at West Kington Stud, then an interesting walk through the Irish National Stud. We’ve walked 5* courses with eminent Trainers helping us to find our way across the terrain and over the fences. We’ve become racehorse trainers both at Lambourn at Warren Greatex, then visiting Oaksey House where the Injured Jockeys can get rehabilitation and again at Jessica Harrington’s fabulous yard in Tipperary. Our new Rep for Scotland Jen Burnett put us all to shame with her Saddlery Day in Auchterarder Village Hall and she has something interesting up her sleeve for this year.

At this point I feel we may all give ourselves a clap, because we’ve also become fund raisers for Charities & I would like to read to you a couple of letters firstly from Ruby Walsh, Chair of the Irish Injured Jockey’s Fund, and then the Equine Grass Sickness Fund, add to these the £300 sent by Amy Bannister Bell to the Injured Jockeys Fund UK in 2018 & 2019; we are some group of people.

The F&I Summer Camp at Wellington – I sincerely promise David that Ann & I will not attend again but it was worth it to see the look on Eric Smiley’s face AND to jump a ‘show jump upsides’ with Ann passing Eric on the approach – and I can now do my “Dimagamols”. Another excellent 2 days.

However, I’m asking you now to put this date, 25th July, into your diaries for Ladies Day at Hickstead in the BHS box. In 2019 we were a small number and it has been strongly mentioned that if we cannot bring forward more of our own guests then the day will no longer be ours but maybe opened up to all APCs. So, I really don’t want this to happen it is a unique day for us and our family and friends where we can let our hair down, do come and join us. Whilst I’m talking about social days some of us got excited about going to Olympia in 2019 but then the tickets were very expensive. I’m going to remind you all in the Spring Newsletter and ask for half payment by a date in June and full payment by the required date later this year and ask for the dates YOU would most like. November is the BHS Charity Race and we always have a member of F&I in the ‘field’, so I’m asking for a volunteer.

Down to the nitty gritty of this Association – our training days. Thanks to Judy Harvey for her ‘spring clean’ for Coaches & riders, to Andrew Bennie for coaching a varied group of horses on the flat through grids & across related distances at Myerscough Arena in June and to Pammy Hutton for her time, horses and facilities in September. Pammy was assisted by Islay coaching a group of BHSIs as well as prospective BHSIs. Sadly, the day due to be run at Ingestre, despite a change of date, did not go ahead, neither did the ‘sit with the judge’ day at the BD Nationals with Jenny Ward BD List 1 judge. To this effect your committee has decided, and I sincerely hope with your approval, that whilst we have the funds, days which are with these wonderful coaches/trainers should not be lost. So, as long as there is a nucleus of F&I members participating, those days will be sponsored by F&I to keep them for members, and this includes the day at Talland. We are then looking for someone to organise a pre BHSI/ST 5 day for those very interested Stage 4 students who are seriously looking to progress to the BHSI. I have been reminded that Scholarships are available for help towards future qualifications via your BHS Regional Representatives.

Any days I’ve missed I apologise but thank you to all the organisers AND a big thank you to all the report writers. As you will have seen F&I has two tickets booked for the National Equine Forum on 5th March, I will ask Corrine & Adam to draw two names out of the box at the end of this AGM for two people lucky enough to have entrance to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Westminster. Here, I’d like to thank BHS Education for their help in providing the lanyards, some at the last minute! We also thank Chris Parker, here at Addington, and his team for making us feel so welcome and providing such superb facilities.

Later this evening Islay Auty will give us a brief look at the International Group for Equestrian Qualifications. After supper Dr Andrew Hemmings from the Royal Agricultural College will guide us through Equine Stereotypic Behaviour.
Tomorrow, we continue with these two wonderful Coaches Corinne & Adam whose talk this morning about their own methodologies has filled us with enthusiasm and yet more helpful tips for our own coaching. Their affinity with the horse knows no bounds. Next year we can look forward to two more excellent Coaches, yet to be revealed…”

Jillie Rogers BHSI
7th January 2020

Submit research for the UK Coaching journal

As you may know, our friends at UK Coaching publish a research journal and are always looking for research articles to publish.  If you have a piece of research to publish, we would encourage you to send it in to UK Coaching.  For more information on the journal and read previous editions, see https://www.ukcoaching.org/statements/research and for guidance on submissions seehttps://www.ukcoaching.org/getattachment/statements/Research/UK-Coaching-Research-Journal-submission-guidance-2019.pdf?lang=en-GB

The deadline for submissions for the next publication is the 30th November 2019.

Equestrian Webinar

Can a contemporary theory of skill development be applied to equestrian (and other) sports? Hosted by Marianne Davies. All information is below plus the booking information and links.

Webinar information:

Our good friends at UK Coaching have opened the opportunity to engage in this fascinating webinar to be delivered by Marianne Davies from 9am on the 1st November.

Marianne has been involved in coaching and sport development for over 25 years. She has worked mostly with adventure sports, as a coach, coach educator, QA/IV officer, and national trainer. She spent eight years as the Coaching Manager for Canoe Wales (Paddlesports NGB) where she implemented the roll-out of the UKCC coaching awards and the British Canoeing performance awards.

Marianne’s interest in skill acquisition was galvanised during her undergraduate degree in Sport, Health & Physical Education and her undergraduate research looking at the influence of challenge level and practice structure on skill acquisition. Through her experience as a practitioner she become interested in understanding the influence of motivation and engagement on skill development and participation. She went on to do a Research Masters exploring the interaction of motivation (Self-determination theory) and learning and is currently doing a PhD at Hartpury University applying an ecological dynamics framework to skill acquisition and coaching in equestrian sports.

Marianne has always had horses and whilst her work has been in adventure sports primarily, her passion has always been horses. She says “Equestrian sports present a unique and fascinating challenge for skill development, the process of coaching and to coach education.”

As well as coaching, research and coach development, Marianne writes many academic and practical articles and blogs. Many of these can be found on the UK Coaching membership community at Connected Coaches.

An outline of the webinar content is below.  I hope as many of you will be able to participate in this as possible

Equestrian webinar – Can a contemporary theory of skill development be applied to equestrian (and other) sports?

Date – Friday 1st November

Time – 9am to 11am (may not last a full 2 hours)

Presenter – Marianne Davies, summary as follows:

Re-weaving the Coaching Rainbow: Can a contemporary theory of skill development be applied to equestrian (and other) sports?
In this webinar, we will explore how Ecological Dynamics and a Constraints-Led Approach can be applied to equestrian sports coaching. We will examine traditional concepts of learning, particularly around control and representative practice, highlighting how many of these are likely to be compromising horse and rider skill-development, welfare and safety.
Equestrian coaching already applies a Constraints-Led Approach to many sub-disciplines of the sport. However, without an understanding of the underpinning theory of skill development (i.e. Ecological Dynamics), it arguably spans the very best and worst of coaching practices. This webinar should be fascinating, informative and useful for anyone involved in coaching equestrian sports, or other adventure, complex or team sports.

Login details – see below, via Webex

UK Coaching invites you to join this Webex meeting: https://ukcoaching.webex.com/webappng/sites/ukcoaching/meeting/download/b722694cfe794ade9fdf34289bec9add?siteurl=ukcoaching&MTID=mb10227b778990ebe751b780390ba3d55

Meeting number (access code): 950 308 426

Password is required, so anyone interested should contact, Jillie Rogers, Sally Newcomb or Laura Hood for the password

 

BHS Charity Race

The BHS are holding another fundraising charity race at the prestigious Newbury Racecourse on 7 November, with twelve amateur jockeys including event rider Nick Gauntlett taking part to fundraise for their vital work. After the exhilarating race will be a celebratory lunch, an auction and a full afternoon of racing. It would be great it if you could support the BHS on this day by booking a lunch ticket (to include the racing) and maybe bringing a friend or table of guests along too. Tickets at £55 each can be booked here   https://www.bhs.org.uk/get-involved/challenge-events/newbury-charity-race

 

Letter to BHS Members from Tim Lord Chairman of the Board of Trustees

“Dear Member,  

I am writing to you, ahead of a general announcement being made later today, to confirm the appointment of the new Chief Executive Officer of The British Horse Society.

James Hick will join the Society on Monday 2nd December 2019 bringing with him a wealth of experience and proven success in leading a multi-faceted organisation.  James is currently the Managing Director for ManpowerGroup Enterprise, UK and Ireland, and has worked for the ManpowerGroup since 1993.

James has been a member of The BHS for over 10 years and he breeds and shows Shire horses in his spare time so is involved with and knows the equestrian community very well.

I, along with my fellow Trustees, am delighted that James will be leading the Society through the next phase of our strategic plan. As we get close to James joining us officially, we will share more news about him and plans for his introduction to our amazing Charity.

Please look out for a brief feature on James in the next issue of British Horse magazine, due at the end of November.

Thank you for your continued support of The British Horse Society. We couldn’t do all the great work we do without you.

Tim Lord

Chairman of the Board of Trustees”

F&I SUMMER CAMP AT WELLINGTON 2019

The summer camp started on Tuesday 24th September where Eric Smiley FBHS was going to be doing gridwork sessions focusing on mental gymnastics. There was a line set up in the indoor arena, but Eric promptly changed the lay out.

I was in the first group of the afternoon and you could tell straight away Eric wasn’t going to accept any “waffle”. We had to give him clear and precise answers and we were questioned a lot to really clarify our understanding and to make sure what we say can be understood by the clients we teach.

We started working on a 20m circle with poles at each four points and we had to focus on riding forwards, straight and regular. Eric wouldn’t use rhythm as it is a different thing to regular (if there’s a three-time beat with a moment of suspension then there’s rhythm but we then need to make sure the canter is regular). We also had to keep out of the saddle and in a light seat. It was discussed that all the top riders keep a light seat, in particular we discussed Andrew Nicholson’s position.

These poles were then raised to jumps and again we had to keep the canter regular. The exercise then progressed to riding a figure of eight with a bounce, all the while making sure we kept riding forwards, straight and regular but not riding any corners! The theme continued through all three grid sessions.

After the grid sessions, we were very fortunate to observe a study being conducted by The Animal Health Trust on the use of Water Treadmills. They are conducting this study as currently water treadmill use isn’t regulated and there isn’t evidence to show its effects. They put GPS sensors on the horse and filmed the horse walking up in hand on the hard prior to going onto the treadmill. Once complete the horse went onto the treadmill and the water levels were increased throughout the session and at every increment the horse was filmed for 20 seconds. The water went to knee/hock height at the end. After 15 minutes on the treadmill the water was drained, the horse was stationary and had measurements of its back taken and recorded. After this, the horse was then walked in hand whilst being filmed. This is done every time to measure and analyse any changes in the horse’s muscles and movement. After we were also lucky to have a debate with Rachael Corry the Equine Bowen Therapist & Director of Wellingtons therapy centre.

Wednesday morning, Eric started with two flatwork lessons where the theme from Tuesday continued – riding the horses forward, straight and regular. Eric wanted the riders to control the balance and get the horse to sit and wait whilst keeping the hind leg active and under and not to let it drop out.

This continued into the SJ lessons where we also focussed on the riding the line and pace. We still weren’t allowed to ride corners as corners change the canter whereas riding a curve doesn’t. We still had to be clear and precise and not give any waffle. Throughout all lessons, Eric got us to look at the horse’s eyes and ears as they will lock and hone in on where they’re going. It is our job to consistently ride the canter forwards, straight and regular and it was the horse’s job to do the jump and if it didn’t, we were to change nothing – the horse must want to do it. If they knocked a pole, we were to growl at them to give them a conscience and make them allergic to paint!

After the SJ lessons, there was a Pony Club demonstration where Eric taught two plucky PC girls.  One called “Aoife, Caoimhe, Maeve Murphy” who had her D+ badge and Ann who didn’t have any PC badges. These riders are also known as Jillie Rogers BHSI and Ann Bostock BHSI! Now, Eric took his life into his own hands and made them jump the jumps as a pair as he stood between them to keep them straight! It was all good fun and light entertainment.

We stopped for a yummy lunch put on by the Café at Wellington before going XC, which if I do say so myself, was FANTASTIC! The emphasis was still on riding clear and precise and forwards, straight and balanced. In the warmup, we had to jump to the line. Eric put two bits of bark on a log and we had to ride between them straight and on angles. We discussed and put to practice riding away from fences as well as riding on curves to shorten the course which will help to make the optimum time. He got us jumping lines that really got us thinking.

After XC we watched and discussed two young horses being ridden by David and Mandy. During this time, it was very much a discussion on how Eric produces his youngsters, and the confirmation and going of the two horses in front of us. He wanted the horses to be relaxed and forwards, not us putting them into an outline. He said he would much prefer to have a contact, not an outline as that can come later.  He wanted the horse’s poll up and out to prevent the nose going on its chest.

Next up for this full-on day was loose jumping two young horses. One owned by Cheryl (for a week) and the other was David’s. We discussed how loose jumping can be done badly and how we must avoid this. We would see how the horses went as to what we would do with the jumps next – guide rail, shortening the distance, putting a block in etc.

In the evening, we again had a super dinner thanks to the café before an exclusive evening talk and book launch with Eric which was very interesting and we could buy a signed copy of the book “Two Brains, One Aim”

Thursday morning Eric continued with SJ lessons and Nereide Goodman, List 1 Dressage judge come in to judge a test we had chosen and then work through it with us. The tests ranged from Novice to CCI 2 & 3* and Inter 1. It was so useful to hear the comments and marks in our ear whilst doing the test and working through certain movements afterwards was invaluable. I also found Nereide very much coached in a similar style to Eric, we had to keep it regular and to control the shoulders and keep the hind leg active and engaged as that’s where its won or lost.

The whole camp was superb, and I would like to take this opportunity to thank David and the team at Wellington Riding along with Eric and Nereide for superb lessons. I’m sure I’m not the only person who feels enthused, refreshed and motivated for coaching clients and riding. 

Report written by Charlotte Tarrant BHSI